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Pig fecal and tonsil contamination of Yersinia enterocolita in one French slaughterhouse

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Pig is considered to be the main animal reservoir of human pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica strains.

The bacterium can be isolated from its tongue, tonsils, but can also be found in feces and on carcasses.

In France, while the main pathogenic biotypes are known for humans (4/O:3, 2/O:9 and 3/O:5,27), few prevalence data are available in the pork chain production and mainly focus on tonsils contamination.
PDF icon Pig fecal and tonsil contamination of Yersinia enterocolita in one French slaughterhouse
2011

Pig fecal and tonsils contamination of Yersinia enterocolita in one French slaughterhouse

Consulter le resumé

Poster.

Yersinia enterocolitica is the third most important cause of gastro-intestinal diseases transmitted by contaminated foodstuff s consumption in Europe (Efsa, 2011). Pig is considered to be the primary reservoir for the human pathogenic types of Y. enterocolitica; mainly for biotype 4 (serotype O:3). Biotype 2 (serotype O:9) has been isolated from other animal species, such as cattle, sheep and goats. The pigs develop no clinical signs, but carry Y. enterocolitica on the tongue, tonsils and in the lymph nodes and excrete the bacterium in their feces (Nesbakken et al., 2003). Moreover, seasonal trends in the carriage of Y. enterocolitica by pigs have been identifi ed, with winter identifi ed as a risk period in the UK (Milnes et al., 2009) and Germany (Weber & Knapp, 1981). In this study, we assessed the Y. enterocolitica prevalence on carcasses at the end of the slaughtering process, together with the determination of pathogenic and non-pathogenic biotypes, in order to better characterize the importance of the hazard for pork. To this end, parallel samples were made on tonsils, feces and carcass of the same pig in a winter period in order to evaluate the risk of cross-contamination. Unrelated feces and tonsils samples were also collected in summer, as this season is considered to be rather unfavorable to Y. enterocolitica. These data were compared to tonsils and feces results obtained during the cold period.

PDF icon Poster de Carole Feurer et al.
2011